Breast implants can be used to:

  • Enlarge small breasts
  • Restore breast volume after weight reduction or pregnancy and breastfeeding
  • Even up asymmetric breasts
  • Reconstruct a breast after mastectomy or injury

Implants are placed behind the breast, not within the breast tissue. Implants can be inserted either:

  • Between the breast tissue and the chest muscle, or
  • Behind the large chest muscle called the pectoralis major

 

Patient information provided as part of this website is evidence-based, and sourced from a range of reputable information providers including the Plastic Surgery Foundation, Australian Society of Plastic Surgeons and the American Society of Plastic Surgeons.

Breast lift surgery is also known as Mastopexy surgery.  Mastopexy is a procedure that lifts the breasts by removing excess skin and surrounding tissue when necessary. This surgical removal  reshapes and supports the new breast contour. Mastopexy creates a more firm and raised appearance of the breasts. During the breast lift procedure the surgeon may also reduce the size of the areola.

A breast lift may be a good option for you if:

  • You are physically healthy
  • You have realistic expectations
  • Your breasts are fully developed
  • Your breasts are sagging and have lost their shape and firmness
  • Your breasts have a flatter, elongated shape or are pendulous
  • When unsupported, your nipples fall below the breast crease
  • Your nipples and areolas point downward
  • You have stretched skin and enlarged areolas
  • One breast is lower than the other

 

Patient information provided as part of this website is evidence-based, and sourced from a range of reputable information providers including the Plastic Surgery Foundation, Australian Society of Plastic Surgeons and the American Society of Plastic Surgeons.

Breast lift with augmentation surgery is a very common procedure in Australia. Mastopexy is a procedure that lifts the breasts by removing excess skin and surrounding tissue when necessary, this is combines with the placement of breast implants at the time of surgery or in a two staged procedure. This surgical removal of excess skin and tissue reshapes and supports the new breast contour and the addition of a breast implant creates added fullness. During the breast lift part of the procedure the surgeon may also reduce the size of the areola.

A breast lift with augmentation may be a good option for you if:

  • You are physically healthy
  • You have realistic expectations
  • Your breasts are fully developed
  • Your breasts are sagging and have lost their shape and firmness
  • Your breasts have a flatter, elongated shape or are pendulous
  • When unsupported, your nipples fall below the breast crease
  • Your nipples and areolas point downward
  • You have stretched skin and enlarged areolas
  • One breast is lower than the other

 

Patient information provided as part of this website is evidence-based, and sourced from a range of reputable information providers including the Plastic Surgery Foundation, Australian Society of Plastic Surgeons and the American Society of Plastic Surgeons.

Breast implant revision surgery, which commonly involves removal and/or replacement of saline or silicone breast implants. Revision surgery is performed to change the size or type of your implants you have and to correct any complications from your primary breast augmentation. When an implant ruptures breast implant revision surgery is performed to surgically remove the ruptures silicone or saline implant and replace the ruptured implant with a new implant, most women opt for replacement of both implants at this time. Revision surgery is performed for CC, DB and various other aesthetic complications.

CC – Capsular Contracture

DB  – Double Bubble

The following are some common reasons why you may want to consider breast revision:

  • You are in good health.
  • You are not a smoker.
  • You wish to increase or decrease the size of your breasts.
  • You wish to correct breast asymmetry.
  • You want to address problems that have developed with your implants and/or surrounding breast tissue.
  • Pregnancy and/or breast-feeding has changed the appearance of your implants.
  • Weight loss or weight gain has negatively affected the appearance of your breast implants.
  • You should have undergone a breast lift with your initial augmentation, but did not.
  • You are unhappy with the results of previous surgery due to poor implant placement or other aesthetic problems.
  • Breast implant rupture

Patient information provided as part of this website is evidence-based, and sourced from a range of reputable information providers including the Plastic Surgery Foundation, Australian Society of Plastic Surgeons and the American Society of Plastic Surgeons.

Breast reconstruction may be a good option for you if:

  • You are able to cope well with your diagnosis and treatment
  • You do not have additional medical conditions or other illnesses that may impair healing
  • You have a positive outlook and realistic goals for restoring your breast and body image

Patient information provided as part of this website is evidence-based, and sourced from a range of reputable information providers including the Plastic Surgery Foundation, Australian Society of Plastic Surgeons and the American Society of Plastic Surgeons.

Breast reduction may be a good option for you if:

  • You are physically healthy
  • You have realistic expectations
  • Your breasts are fully developed
  • You are bothered by the feeling that your breasts are too large
  • Your breasts limit your physical activity
  • You experience back, neck and shoulder pain caused by the weight of your breasts
  • You have regular indentations from bra straps that support heavy, pendulous breasts
  • You have skin irritation beneath the breast crease
  • Your breasts hang low and have stretched skin
  • Your nipples rest below the breast crease when your breasts are unsupported
  • You have enlarged areolas caused by stretched skin

 

Patient information provided as part of this website is evidence-based, and sourced from a range of reputable information providers including the Plastic Surgery Foundation, Australian Society of Plastic Surgeons and the American Society of Plastic Surgeons.

Explant Surgery, or breast implant removal is a surgical procedure to remove existing breast implants, and not replace them. This surgery will alter the shape and/or fullness of a woman’s breasts. The surgeon removes the silicone, saline breast implants from under the chest muscles or breast tissue. At the time of surgery the explant surgeon may do a capsulectomy and perform a breast lift. Some women choose to remove breast implants for lifestyle reasons, others for aesthetic reasons and some for health related reasons. Whatever the reason you must understand the healing process for breast implant removal is longer, both physically and emotionally. The breasts take weeks to months to shrink back. You may be left with excess skin post-op, it is best not to perform a breast lift at the time of explant as the breast skin and tissue shrinks back. Give your body time to heal then consider the breast lift post breast implant removal.

Planning for recovery

To plan for recovery, you will need the following information from your explant surgeon before your explant surgery:

  • How long will I be in hospital?
  • Is there any equipment or supplies that I need to buy before my explant surgery? If yes where can I get them?
  • What limits will there be on my physical activities after explant surgery?
  • What limits will I have on lifting after explant surgery?
  • How long will I need to be off work?
  • How long before I can drive a car?

Visit Explant Info for more information on breast implant removal 

Patient information provided as part of this website is evidence-based, and sourced from a range of reputable information providers including the Plastic Surgery Foundation, Australian Society of Plastic Surgeons and the American Society of Plastic Surgeons.

Coming soon

 

Patient information provided as part of this website is evidence-based, and sourced from a range of reputable information providers including the Plastic Surgery Foundation, Australian Society of Plastic Surgeons and the American Society of Plastic Surgeons.

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